Briefly

South Omaha historic district expanded west of 24th Street

By: - February 12, 2024 3:59 pm

South Omaha’s 24th Street corridor is a designated historic district, which was recently expanded. (Cindy Gonzalez/Nebraska Examiner)

LINCOLN — The designated historic district along South Omaha’s “Main Street” just got larger.

History Nebraska announced last week that it had approved an expansion of the South Omaha Main Street Historic District along South 24th Street to include structures along the east side of South 26th Street, between O and M Streets.

The expanded boundary encompasses properties dating from 1938 to 1951 that, the history agency said, represent “typical styles and forms of early 20th century commercial buildings,” ranging from a traditional commercial appearance to the Art Moderne style.  

The historic district was first added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 and extended along South 24th Street between about O and M Streets. 

“It is an example of an end-of-the-streetcar-line, pre-automobile commercial district,” the agency said of the addition.

The National Register is the nation’s inventory of historic properties and districts deemed worthy of preservation. It is part of a national program to coordinate and support local and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect the nation’s historic and archeological resources. 

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Paul Hammel
Paul Hammel

Senior Reporter Paul Hammel has covered the Nebraska state government and the state for decades. Previously with the Omaha World-Herald, Lincoln Journal Star and Omaha Sun, he is a member of the Omaha Press Club's Hall of Fame. He grows hops, brews homemade beer, plays bass guitar and basically loves traveling and writing about the state. A native of Ralston, Nebraska, he is vice president of the John G. Neihardt Foundation.

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